419 scams

Confirmation #9795
17584179373800___9795@kkkav.naturalprogressiontips.com


Scam Email received 7/14/2020

Email From:

17584179373800___9795@kkkav.naturalprogressiontips.com

Sender Name:

KETO-TONE

Other emails used:

,

Email Subject:

Confirmation #9795


Confirmation #9795 – 17584179373800___9795@kkkav.naturalprogressiontips.com


*Real Weight Loss Results – Faster, Easier and Cheaper!* Dear customer: Thank you for purchasing our new Horizontally-opposed twin-cylinder 2-Stroke NGH GTT70 gasoline engine. Your new GTT70 engine has been developed by NGH engineers to offer all hobbyists a new 2-Stroke engine. You will be delighted with stability, fuel economy, plenty of power of your new GTT70 engine. We hope that you will enjoy with your new engine, and have many fun and safe flying experiences with its use. —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug Hi! Thanks for joining the 529 Garage. Your 529 Garage user name is: Now, setup a password to complete your signup The kkkAv team —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug Hi FYMRjUUBDY! Welcome to kkkAv! You’re only a few steps away from joining thousands of publishers and bloggers already using our widget. To verify and complete your registration, please copy and paste the verification code below into the corresponding textbox on our site. Your verification code is Can’t find the textbox to paste your verification code? Just click the link below to redirect to our site. Please note this link will become inactive in 48 hours: Need further assistance? Have any questions? Send us email at We look forward to boosting your traffic through our exclusive readers’ exchange ecosystem! —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug Dear Graduate, An oral medicine was able to hinder the coronavirus behind COVID-19 as it attempted to replicate itself in human lung cells in test tubes, scientists reported in April. It also hampered the reproduction of closely related coronaviruses in mice for several days and improved the animals’ lung function. The drug, called EIDD-2801, interferes with a key mechanism that allows the SARS-CoV-2 virus to reproduce in high numbers and cause infections, the researchers explained in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Human trials have not yet been done, but if the effect is similar in people, the drug could be the first pill available to help with the COVID-19 pandemic, which had resulted in more than three million cases and at least 225,000 deaths worldwide as of press time. An oral medication would be a boon because it would be easier to give to people than an intravenous injection. The study was done by a team at Emory University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Vanderbilt University Medical Center. A company that has licensed the drug, Miami-based Ridgeback Biotherapeutics, has just been granted permission from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to begin 10 patient trials of the antiviral pill in the next few months. The same university collaboration had already found that Gilead Sciences’ experimental medicine remdesivir was effective in shutting down replication of the coronaviruses that caused the original SARS and MERS epidemics. Remdesivir has received attention because it entered clinical trials against SARS-CoV-2 in March, and the first results appeared in late April. The findings announced so far indicate that EIDD-2801 is possibly even more successful in disrupting coronavirus replication than the Gilead drug. On March 20 the researchers investigating EIDD-2801, co-led by Tim Sheahan of U.N.C. Chapel Hill, posted the results of their animal studies on the preprint server bioRxiv while submitting them for peer review. Given the current COVID-19 crisis, “it was important to share,” says George Painter, a professor of pharmacology and president of the Emory Institute for Drug Development, which first produced the drug. Back in 2018 Painter and the labs he leads identified EIDD-2801’s activity during a search for a universal influenza medicine. Last October, before the pandemic hit, the Emory program got $15.9 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to perform human tests of the drug against the flu virus that was likely to be circulating later in the year. When SARSCoV-2 emerged, Painter’s group immediately shifted focus. EIDD-2801 inhibits the coronavirus’s self-copying operations in a manner that is different from remdesivir’s. Whereas remdesivir brings that replication process to a full stop, EIDD-2801 introduces mutations— mistakes—into the virus’s RNA as it makes copies, leaving the viral RNA so damaged that it cannot infect cells. Another feature of the drug is that it is able to work against a host of other RNA viruses. Thus, it could serve as a multipurpose antiviral, much in the way that some antibiotics can work against a wide variety of bacteria. In several preclinical studies, researchers from multiple labs have shown that EIDD-2801 was effective against several strains of influenza, as well as respiratory syncytial virus and the viruses that cause chikungunya, Venezuelan equine encephalitis and Eastern equine encephalitis—all microbes that intermittently pop up in different parts of the world and produce widespread sickness. The compound may be initially beneficial as a “prophylaxis health care workers can take to prevent an infection,” says Wayne Holman, co-founder of Ridgeback, which has licensed the drug from Emory’s nonprofit biotech company Drug Innovation Ventures at Emory (DRIVE). Another potential use of EIDD-2801 might be to protect uninfected nursing home residents and workers if an outbreak occurs inside a facility. Holman says the wider goal is to have an oral pill that can be taken twice a day by patients at home early in the course of the disease to prevent it from progressing to hospitalization, mechanical ventilation or death. In addition to planning clinical trials in the U.S., Ridgeback has also asked U.K. authorities to start tests there. “We’ve done three to four years of development work in just the past three to four weeks in response to the new pandemic,” Holman says. —Michael Waldholz Loneliness hurts. It is psychologically distressing and so physically un – healthy that being lonely increases the likelihood of an earlier death by 26 percent. But the feeling may serve a purpose. Psychologists theorize that it hurts so much because, like hunger and thirst, loneliness acts as a biological alarm bell. The ache of it drives us to seek out social connection just as hunger pangs urge us to eat. The idea is intuitively satisfying, yet it has long proved difficult to test in humans. On March 26, however, just as the COVID-19 pandemic gripped the world, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology posted a preliminary report on bioRxiv. It was the first study in humans to show that both loneliness and hunger share signals deep in a part of the brain that governs very basic impulses for reward and motivation. The findings point to one telling conclusion: our need to connect is apparently as fundamental as our need to eat. The extraordinary scientific timing of the paper’s release—just as tens of millions of people were suddenly starved for contact—was far from intentional. When they began the work three years ago, neuroscientists Livia Tomova and Rebecca Saxe and their colleagues wanted to demonstrate how loneliness operates in the brain. They were inspired by similar research in animals and by the pioneering loneliness studies of the late University of Chicago psychologist John Cacioppo. But enforced social isolation is so rare in healthy, nonincarcerated humans that it gave the team pause. “I sometimes struggled to articulate what that would be like in the real world,” Saxe admits. “Why would that ever happen?” By the time the researchers came to write their study this year, the unimaginable had become real. Now, Saxe says, “what feels most significant about this paper is that it’s a way to step out side the experience we’re having and look on it through a different lens.” give a name to what countless people are experiencing right now: social craving while staying at home to protect the public health.” The paper, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, describes a carefully designed experiment using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare brain responses to loneliness and hunger. After a baseline brain scan, 40 adult participants underwent two 10-hour sessions: one in which they were deprived of food and another where they were denied social contact. The sessions served as control conditions for each other. The social-isolation condition was challenging to arrange. Some people are lonely in a crowd, whereas others enjoy solitude. To induce not just objective isolation but subjective feelings of loneliness, the researchers had the participants spend their time from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. in a sparsely furnished room at the laboratory without phones, laptops or even novels, in case fictional characters provided some social sustenance. Puzzles were allowed, as was —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug —-BUtuOYKd;WcVLug —-EgeJumyJ;myJK3g vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl vjxl1BDqs7JKPCWmjG6ipl —-;; KETO-TONE – 17584179373800___9795@kkkav.naturalprogressiontips.com

The above email is a scam. If you still think is legitimate, but you’re still concerned, then follow these steps:

Ten Minutes 10 minutes.

How to check if you received a scam email

  1. Google the details.

    Do a Google search for the persons name/company name that the email has come from.

  2. Confirm the details.

    Visit their website and look for a phone number or email address. Search for the website yourself. Do not assume the details in the email are valid.

  3. Confirm using the information you have found

    Using the details you have researched, call or email the business and ask them to verify the information within the email.

  4. Check if the email has been sent to multiple people

    Google snippets of the email text to see if the same format has been used in the past. eg “Army officer from Syria but now living with the United Nations on asylum”

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