Inheritance scams

FROM THE DESK OF MR.KATTAN AL AZMAL BILL AND EXCHANGE MANAGER,
gabrielwaki58@gmail.com


Scam Email received July 3, 2018 from gabrielwaki58@gmail.com

gabrielwaki58@gmail.com
gabrielwaki58@gmail.com
Email From:

gabrielwaki58@gmail.com

Subject:

FROM THE DESK OF MR.KATTAN AL AZMAL BILL AND EXCHANGE MANAGER,

Other emails used:

gabrielwaki58@gmail.com, gabrielwaki58@gmail.com

Email Subject:

FROM THE DESK OF MR.KATTAN AL AZMAL BILL AND EXCHANGE MANAGER,


FROM THE DESK OF MR.KATTAN AL AZMAL BILL AND EXCHANGE MANAGER, – gabrielwaki58@gmail.com


Sent from: Gabriel Waki FROM THE DESK OF MR.KATTAN AL AZMAL BILL AND EXCHANGE MANAGER, UNITED BANK OF AFRICA (UBA), KUMROMA TUNDE MOTORS, REPUBLIC DU BENIN. My Dear Friend, How are you doing today? I will explain my self little to you before I continue. I am the manager of bill and exchange at the foreign remittance department of UNITED BANK FOR AFRICA (UBA).I am writing to seek your interest over a partnership business transaction. In my department we discovered an abandoned sum of $15m US dollars (FIFTEEN MILLIONS US DOLLARS). In an account that belongs to one of our foreign customer who died along with his entire family in November 2012 in a plane crash. Since we got information about his death, we have been expecting his next of kin to come over and claim his money because we cannot release it unless somebody applies for it as next of kin or relation to the deceased as indicated in our banking guidelines but unfortunately I learnt that all his supposed next of kin or relation died alongside with him at the plane crash leaving nobody behind for the claim. It is therefore upon this discovery that I and one other official in my department have decided to make this business proposal to you and release the money to you as the next of kin or relation to the deceased for safety and subsequent disbursement since nobody is coming for it and we don’t want this money to go into the Government treasury as unclaimed funds. The Banking law and guideline here stipulates that if such money remained unclaimed after seven years, the money will be transferred into the Bank&s treasury as unclaimed fund. The request of a foreigner as next of kin in this business is occasioned by the fact that the customer was a foreigner and a citizen of our country cannot stand as next of kin to a foreigner. We agree that 40 % of this money will be for you as foreign partner, in respect to the provision of a foreign account, 10 % will be set aside for expenses incurred during the business and 50 % would be for me and my colleague. Thereafter I will visit your country for disbursement of the fund according to the percentages indicated in this proposal. Therefore to enable the immediate transfer of this fund to you as arranged, You must apply first to the bank as relations or next of kin of the deceased indicating your bank name, your bank account number, your private telephone and fax number for easy and effective communication and location where in the money will be remitted. Upon receipt of your reply, I will send to you by email the format of the application. I will not fail to bring to your notice that this transaction is hitch free and that you should not entertain any atom of fear as all required arrangements have been made by me and my colleague in the bank for the smooth and effective transfer of the money into your designated bank account that you provide. You should contact me immediately as soon as you receive this letter. Trusting to hear from you immediately. Time is not a negligible factor in this business because we have limited time at our disposal. Yours faithfully Mr.Gabriel Waki Bill and Exchange Manager, (UBA) Email (gabrielwaki58@gmail.com) gabrielwaki58@gmail.com

The above email is a scam. If you still think is legitimate, but you’re still concerned, then follow these steps:

Ten Minutes 10 minutes.

How to check if you received a scam email

  1. Google the details.

    Do a Google search for the persons name/company name that the email has come from.

  2. Confirm the details.

    Visit their website and look for a phone number or email address. Search for the website yourself. Do not assume the details in the email are valid.

  3. Confirm using the information you have found

    Using the details you have researched, call or email the business and ask them to verify the information within the email.

  4. Check if the email has been sent to multiple people

    Google snippets of the email text to see if the same format has been used in the past. eg “Army officer from Syria but now living with the United Nations on asylum”

Most of us know someone who is vulnerable to these types of attacks. Fortunately, if you’re aware of the presence of these scams, and armed with some basic knowledge on identifying them, you can greatly reduce your chances people you know becoming a victim. Please help them by sharing this information on Facebook or Twitter using the #telltwo and #takefive hashtags.
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